LETTERS

MANNHEIM, PA. One of the most visible changes of Bob Mader's moving to the Editor-in-Chief position is that he gets to write the parting shot. I really appreciated today's [June issue] read. Caveat emptor. Let the buyer beware. This month's editorial (June, p. 94) about the cast iron soil pipe controversy is pure, sensible goodness from the opinion of a journalist who's been an active participant

MANNHEIM, PA. — One of the most visible changes of Bob Mader's moving to the Editor-in-Chief position is that he gets to write the parting shot. I really appreciated today's [June issue] read.

Caveat emptor. Let the buyer beware.

This month's editorial (June, p. 94) about the cast iron soil pipe controversy is pure, sensible goodness from the opinion of a journalist who's been an active participant in the industry for many years. Many thanks, Bob. Having seen several of the back-and-forth letters on the subject, which have been fanning the flames, you offer good counsel based on a healthy blend of experience and industry insight.

I work with a lot of engineers, installers and building owners who have every right to expect that the materials they work with, or buy, will perform as expected, providing years of reliable, trouble-free service. But buyers should know there are risks (caveat emptor!), even when specifying, buying or installing one of the lowliest of all products on the jobsite — cast iron soil pipe.

Thanks for staking a position on it, Bob — offering the advice that we universally accept time-honored, jobsite-proven CISPI and ASTM requirements. Many of us will appreciate that this advice focuses on pipe quality and performance, regardless of its origin. If it comes with CISPI or ASTM certification, then we're assured that the quality goes in before the name goes on.
JOHN VASTYAN
COMMON GROUND
COMMUNICATIONS, MANHEIM, PA

Yates' story of rediscovery is inspiring

DENVER — Dave Yates' story of rediscovering his life is an inspiration to everyone who needs to take control of his heath. When I quit smoking 50 years ago, I felt I was depriving myself and would miss the smokes forever. When I finally got off the hook for good, I discovered that life was better by a hundred times … food tasted better, I had far more energy and life took on a whole new color.

Like Dave I added poundage, but with my new found energy level I added handball, running, weight lifting and tennis to my skiing and fast pitch softball. Once I reached the point of not needing food as a sub for tobacco the weight came off and stayed off and is still off.

There is a great book written by a M.D. in collaboration with a writer that I think Dave and other readers would enjoy. The title is “Younger Next Year.” It's basically about tending to your own health as Dave is doing rather than depending on the medical profession to provide pills and procedures … it's a great read.

I cringe when I hear the term “health care” used where “medical care “ is what is really meant. We are the only ones who can provide for our health.

Good luck and keep it up. I look forward to reading Dave's columns for many more years now that he's got it figured out.
LOU BINDNER
CLIMATE ENGINEERING INC.,
DENVER