Myths about Water Shortages Dispelled

Reports now indicate that the “killer drought” of 2012 in the United States appears to be lessening and may prove not as bad as originally believed.

VISTA, CA - Reports now indicate that the “killer drought” of 2012 in the United States appears to be lessening and may prove not as bad as originally believed.
 
However, it is still the worst drought to hit the country since 1956 and already ranks fifth on the list of the top ten droughts the country has ever experienced.
 
But because it seems to be lifting, there are some that believe droughts and water shortages, especially here in the United States, are myths and that our water problems will soon wash away.
 
“That is Myth #1,” says Klaus Reichardt, CEO and founder of Waterless Co., manufacturers of no-water urinal systems. “The U.S. is not immune to water shortages and we can no longer expect an endless supply of inexpensive water in this country.”

According to Reichardt, there are four other myths about water shortages that need to be addressed. These are:

Myth #2: There is no world water crisis.
This myth is more prevalent in North America than anywhere else. The truth of the matter is, 1.1 billion people—the equivalent of one of every six people on the planet—do not have access to clean, sustainable water.

Myth #3: Climate change has nothing to do with water shortages.
According to a February 2012 report in the ACS Journal of Environmental Research Science & Technology, more than 1 in 3 counties in the United States could face a “high” or “extreme” risk of water shortage due to climate change by the middle of the 21st century.

Myth #4: Water scarcity will remain primarily a third-world problem
There is every indication that water scarcity will be a growing problem in all corners of the world in the 21st century.

Myth #5: There is not much I can do to make a difference.
Conserving water and using it more efficiently is something all of us—at home, in the office, or at school—must do. This is a joint venture and it requires everyone’s participation.

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