Pennsylvania DCNR seeks renewable fuel to fire a district hydronic heating system, Part 1

Pennsylvania DCNR seeks renewable fuel to fire a district hydronic heating system, Part 1

The new facility includes a 10,000-sq.ft., 20-person office building and a 5,500-sq.ft. maintenance shop, where the department services heavy equipment. The buildings’ in-slab radiant floors are heated by two redundant Fröling P4 wood-pellet burning boilers, imported by Tarm USA, in New Hampshire. Of the boilers at Weiser, the larger unit is capable of modulating between 30-130 MBH while the smaller unit can provide heating outputs between 20-85 MBH. They run at about 86% efficiency. To improve efficiency and responsiveness of the system, Longenecker provided a heavily-insulated, 400-gal. buffer tank that provides long run times.

PINE GROVE, PA. — Over the past several decades, the term “automatic heating system” was lost in the cold, ash heap of time. Once in the vernacular of heating professionals, the term was conceived when oil took America’s heating systems by storm after M.A. Fessler invented the oil burner to take advantage of the crude oil that was seeping out of the California ground in 1903.

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