Floating Gardens in Mindoro, Wis., uses aquaponics
Waste from farmed fish provides nutrients for plants grown hydroponically — raising plants in water without soil — which, in turn, purifies the water. Pictured is some of the aquaponics system at Floating Gardens in Mindoro, Wis.

Down on the farm: Aquaponics operation thrives with heating system

Aquaponics combines aquaculture, or fish farming, and hydroponics in a closed-loop system. Hydronic heating provided the control needed to regulate the heat in the greenhouse.

MINDORO, WIS. — First off, what the heck is aquaponics, you ask? It’s a cycle of life, really. Waste from farmed fish provides nutrients for plants grown hydroponically — raising plants in water without soil — which, in turn, purifies the water. In essence, aquaponics combines aquaculture, or fish farming, and hydroponics in a closed-loop system. The nutrient-rich water that results from raising fish provides a source of natural fertilizer for the growing plants.

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