ASHRAE to develop water saving standard

SPECIAL TO CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON A representative of the U.S. Department of Energy has invited the plumbing industry to give its feedback on a water conservation standard proposed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The proposed ASHRAE Standard 191 would establish requirements for the amount of water used to operate HVAC, plumbing and irrigation systems.

SPECIAL TO CONTRACTOR

WASHINGTON — A representative of the U.S. Department of Energy has invited the plumbing industry to give its feedback on a water conservation standard proposed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The proposed ASHRAE Standard 191 would establish requirements for the amount of water used to operate HVAC, plumbing and irrigation systems.

"This is what has been approved — the title, scope and purpose of the standard," said Drury B. Crawley, who oversees DOE's building energy software tools researchanddevelopment activities. "This standard would cover the whole range of building types — commercial, residential, industrial and institutional. It has been sent out to review as required by ANSI for feedback."

Crawley spoke Oct. 11 during the fall meeting of the Plumbing Manufacturers Institute here. PMI devoted the morning session to presentations on green buildings and water efficiency.

The proposed title, purpose and scope of the proposed standard are open for public comment until Nov. 20. ASHRAE members are being sought to serve on a committee to write the standard.

The purpose of the proposed standard, Conservation of Water Use in Building, Site and Mechanical Systems, is to provide baseline requirements for the design of buildings, landscapes and mechanical systems that minimize the volume of water required to operate HVAC, plumbing and irrigation systems. The standard would apply to new buildings and major renovation projects as well as the surrounding site. It would address water use efficiency through conservation measures implemented during design and construction of projects. It would not apply to stormwater management.

"Water is the most important renewable resource on this planet," ASHRAE President Terry Townsend, P. E. said in a prepared statement. "To protect this source of life, we must reduce the demand and consumption that the built environment is placing on available water sources. It is our intention to develop a standard that can be used globally to conserve this valuable resource."

To join the committee or comment on the draft title, purpose and scope, interested parties may visit www.ashrae.org/publicreviews and click on Standards Actions for Oct. 6. For more information on Proposed ASHRAE Standard 191, contact Teri Davis by e-mail at [email protected]